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SEEDLING FRUIT TREES

red cardinalattractive to wildlife 

These are trees that are not grafted but rather grown from seed. This means that their fruit 
is generally lower quality and quite a bit more variable than that of a grafted cultivar. 
Still, they are fine for deer and wildlife plantings, and some of them are used as hardy rootstocks.
 

 
Plants Listed: 
Wild Apple Malus antonovka 
Manchurian Crabapple Malus baccata
Manchurian Apricot Prunus armeniaca var. mandschurica 
Siberian Pear Pyrus ussuriensis
Common Pear Pyrus communis
Seedling Plum Prunus americana

 
illustration of wild apple

Wild Apple Malus antonovka

1 to 2 ft. trees $3.00 each, $25 package of 10, $50 package of 25

A vigorously growing seedling apple which is used as a rootstock by northern growers. The fruit is not bad, but nothing to write home about; a large, yellow apple that can be used for drying, cider, sometimes even fresh eating depending on the seedling. (Each one is genetically different.) A good choice for wildlife plantings. 

Manchurian Crabapple Malus baccata

18 in. to 2 ft. trees $3.00 each, $25 package of 10, $50 package of 25

The hardiest member of the apple family, this species is often used as a rootstock for hardy crabapples. The fruit is a small, tart crabapple relished by deer, birds and other wildlife. A foolproof grower in the far North.

 
 
 
illustration of Siberian Pear

Siberian Pear Pyrus ussuriensis 

 

1 to 2 ft. trees $3.00 each, $25 package of 10, $50 package of 25

At least two plants required for pollination.

Extremely hardy pear with an astringent fruit that, althought it is unpalatable, makes a delightful vinegar. The tree has thorns, is a vigorous grower, very hardy, and produces a profusion of white blossoms which open about a week before the apples. Bright orange-red Fall color. 

 
 

Common Pear Pyrus communis 

 

1 to 2 ft. trees $3.00 each, $25 package of 10, $50 package of 25

At least two plants required for pollination.
We use Pyrus communis as a rootstock for most of the pears we graft. It is a hardy, standard size tree which, ungrafted, will bear fruit of variable size and quality. Not as hardy as P. ussuriensis, but compatible with European-type pears for grafting. 

 
 
 
illustration of Manchurian Apricot

 


Manchurian Apricot Prunus armeniaca var. mandschurica

1 to 2 ft. trees $8.00 each

 At least two plants required for pollination.

These seedlings are hardy, but early bloom time makes them a ``lottery ticket'' for many who experience late Spring frosts. The fruit varies with the seedling, but is said to be good for fresh eating, preserves and drying. They grow as a small tree (12 ft. at maturity) and should be planted 10 to15 ft. apart. 
Also check out our improved selection of Manchurian apricot, "Adirondack Gold."

 
 

 

SEEDLING PLUMS

These seedling plums are generally hardier and more resistant to late Spring frosts than the grafted varieties. The fruit does not have the refined taste and texture of a grafted plum, but is still sweet, juicy and good for eating fresh or preserving.  Hardiness and vigorous growth, as well as precocious fruiting habit, are traits that make these seedlings the best choice for marginal growing zones. Unlike a grafted plum, a seedling plum will pollinate another plum of the same name.

Native American Plum Prunus americana

2 to 4 ft. trees $8.00 each

  Extremely hardy and precocious producers of a red-yellow, sweet plum that is delightful eaten fresh. The pulp is universally sweet, while the skin tends to be tart. Grows as a tall shrub or small tree, and can be spaced as close as 5 feet to create a "plum patch" that will yield plenty for birds, kids, neighbors and fresh plum sauce (we use a ``Squeezo'' to separate the pulp from the skins, then store in the freezer.) Ripens late August through September. Will cross-pollinate with a cherry-plum,  with any of the "A" group of grafted plums, or with another Native American seedling plum.